Reviews Of Cambria Books titles

Book Reviews

Average rating: 5 based on 3 reviews

Hymns and Barriers

Hymns and Barriers

5.0 out of 5 stars An era and its personalities captured perfectly and the dilemmas encountered along the way.
Well developed main characters in both familiar and unfamiliar settings with whom I related. I was eager to know more about how their story unfolded and empathised with them in the difficult situation within which they found themselves. The author has perfectly captured the life and personalities of a Welsh valleys town of the era and this contrasts with the equally vividly portrayed narrative of life in post war Burma. A thoroughly enjoyable and thought provoking read.

The Mondegreen Affair

The Mondegreen Affair

5.0 out of 5 stars Witty and engaging
This is a thoroughly enjoyable read. It is witty and intelligent and elegantly written. It is a story that opens up rather like Russian dolls – or at least Belarusian dolls - with stories within stories. It is very accomplished and a highly skilled piece of work, with impressive narrative shifts and convincing voices.

Iant-Steve Blandford

Iant

5.0 out of 5 stars Iant: Beautifully and sensitively written.
It's a very long time since I've read into the depths of night but I found that the sensitivity with which Iant is written struck deep and demanded several re-readings of pertinent paragraphs. This is beautifully written and takes an ordinary life making it extraordinary and immensely relatable. Iant is very moving in its simplicity.

Strength and Tenderness

Strength and Tenderness

“Doug Constable’s hymn-writing has come out of the encounter between an unusually fresh imagination and a series of very specific pastoral contexts; and this means that it is exploratory, genuinely celebratory, challenging, and mercifully free of cliché – both traditional and contemporary cliché. These are humane, candid compositions, and they will be a real gift to all who are looking for words and music that are neither frozen in inherited attitudes nor labouring for an emotional quick fix. I hope they will be welcomed, used and loved.”

On the Border

On the Border

A wonderful story of a rebellious farmer's daughter in Wales.
Megan, at the start of this absorbing account of her rite of passage through her early teens, lives in a male dominated family that is determined to keep her tied to the hearth. Fiercely independent, she works to find her freedom through quiet but determined rebellion, initiative and bravery.
Both aided and thwarted by her family and friends, she matures through adventure, heartache and joy.

Cari Davies writes with the sure touch of an accomplished story-teller, who has surely experienced the same Welsh background as her heroine. I found the book difficult to put down and thoroughly recommend it as a most satisfying read.

On the Border

On the Border

Nostalgic, delightful characters
‘On the Border’ is a coming-of-age story about Megan, a teenage girl growing up on a farm in Wales in the 1950’s. It is a bitter sweet portrayal about finding love, self-discovery and dealing with loss and grief. Cari Davies paints life on a Welsh farm with muddy, smelly reality and has a knack for creating unforgettable characters.
Megan is a gutsy heroine growing up in an era where women’s roles are changing. Iolo is a James Dean like character, wild and attractive. Their love is inevitable but star crossed.
The book is peopled with interesting characters – Ivy and Mabel, the helpers rescued from the asylum by Megan’s great aunt; Edward, Megan’s mysterious uncle from Africa and Roberta, an apartheid refugee.
The book will appeal to young adults with its themes of first love and the challenges of growing up. It will also appeal to adult readers, nostalgic for the dramatic scenery of Wales and a simpler way of life.

On the Border

On the Border

This is a beautiful book. A balm to the current climate we now find ourselves living in. It is a story full of charm and warmth, a love letter of sorts, that really brought to life the beauty of Wales. If you need somewhere to escape, can’t recommend it more. It takes you right into the heat of Welsh farming life and roaring 1950’s London and I thought it’s cast of characters were delightful and eccentric. It’s a true coming of age story about love and loss, that asks important questions about our roots and the places we call home. It made me both laugh and cry.
Highly recommended.

On the Border

On the Border

‘On the border’, is a love letter to the landscape of the Welsh heart. Written with grounded texture, it is a tale which recalls the rain and grit of ordinary life whilst capturing the inspired places we long for in the promise of beyond.

I of Modern Nature

I of Modern Nature

Richard Wheeler’s poems are keen-eyed, arresting, linguistically adroit, and utterly distinctive in their way of juxtaposing image and idea. They explore themes of place, time, memory, desire, and – in many cases – the role of poetry and visual art in creating a jump-cut mental scenography where these are strangely intermixed. An impressive collection and one that offers striking thoughts and perceptions on every page.

Hideous Night

Hideous Night

5.0 out of 5 stars Science Fiction at its best! I was hooked from the first page, and it was difficult to put down. It pushes theoretical physics to the limit and beyond, as the main characters become caught up in a conflict that threatens the very existence of humanity.
It was a very enjoyable read, and for action buffs there is plenty of it, but at the same time the characters seemed real, and I especially appreciated the descriptive passages which give an insight into what makes them tick.