Digital marketing

Book Marketing Costs

Once a book is published, you have to market it to get the word out — but that doesn’t mean it needs to be expensive!

Cambria Publishing provides a limited amount of free promotion and some paid for marketing to authors who publish their books with us as well as selling them online through our eCommerce shop.

Free marketing

  • Social media posts to Facebook, Instagram and Pinterest
  • Inclusion in Nielsen book database
  • Inclusion in Ingram trade newsletter
  • Full page in our eCommerce shop
  • Promotion as features in newsletters
  • Notifications to National Libraries

Paid for marketing available

  • Ingram trade advertising
  • Amazon promotion
  • Pinterest promotion
  • Facebook advertising
  • Nielsen Book2Look digital marketing

Self marketing

Some authors also choose to spend independently on their marketing campaigns.

Here’s a selection of book marketing techniques and how much they cost, so you can decide which path(s) to take. You can also hire a marketing professional to do all this for you if you’d prefer to focus on writing. However, keep in mind that it’ll be a lot cheaper to do it yourself.

5 low-cost marketing tactics

1. Promote on social media. Advertise your book on Twitter, Instagram, and any other social accounts you may have. This is particularly effective if you already have a large following! Use plenty of hashtags and try to get other “bookfluencers” to promote you. Cost: free!

2. Market through your blog and mailing list. Similarly, if you have readership on your blog or through a mailing list, you can promote your book there too. The costs are more variable here, depending on your platforms, but we’ll give you some ballpark lower-end numbers. Cost: £50/year for a website on Squarespace or Wix, £9.99/month for a Mailchimp subscription.

3. Facebook advertising. You can run targeted ads on Facebook to people who have indicated an interest in your subject matter. Be warned, however, that the expenses can really rack up. Cost: at least £5/day.

4. Price promotions on Amazon. Many self-publishing authors go through Amazon KDP, and if you enroll in KDP Select, you can do price promotions on your book to attract readers! Cost: free, but your ebook must be Amazon-exclusive for 90 days.

5. Other third-party promotions. Contact book review blogs and promotional services to get other people to spread the word! Book review blogs take free submissions, but most book promotion websites involve some sort of fee. Cost: $0 for a review, $5-$50 for a promotional listing.

Digital Book Marketing Service

Photo by Elio Santos on Unsplash

Cambria Publishing can now offer its authors ‘Book2Look’ the most advanced digital marketing tool for publishers providing “look inside” functionality to bring your books to life. 

Nielsen Book2Look is a state of the art digital marketing tool which enables your books’ promotional material to be shared digitally. Promote your titles via social media and across the web, allowing a whole new audience to discover your books. Each Book2Look biblet is a streamlined digital presentation of the book which includes features such as readable excerpts, unlimited audio and video clips, multi-format shop links, reviews, book description and much more.

Check out the slide show below that explains its many features.

Contact us if you want to know more about or take advantage of this service.

Book reviews

The importance of book reviews

Reader reviews

Authors often pay too much attention to reviews, at the expense of what really matters: sales. Reviews are an instrument that help encourage sales, but they should never be viewed as an end goal per se.

Reviews alone don’t sell books. Even if you got the most glowing customer review on Amazon, that review in and of itself would not bring more readers to your book page. It would only increase the likelihood that new readers you send to your book page end up purchasing it.

In marketing jargon, customer reviews affect your conversion, but don’t drive traffic.

That’s not to downplay the importance of reviews. But don’t think that a good review will make your book magically start to sell.

Editorial reviews

So far, I’ve been referring mostly to consumer reviews — i.e. reviews from random readers who buy your book.

But a customer review isn’t the only kind of review out there. There are also what we call “editorial reviews,” which are authored by professional or semi-professional reviewers. These are posted on blogs or websites other than Goodreads, Amazon, or other e-retailers.

The most popular examples of editorial reviews are the ones you’ll find in newspapers or online magazines like The Guardian, The New York Review of Books, Times Literary supplement etc. See the latest review on Nation.Cymru for The Cave of Shadows by Cambria author Martyn Rhys Vaughan. Cambria authors have also often been reviewed or interviewed in most of the local and national newspapers (Western Mail) in Wales such as they are.

This kind of an editorial review is the dream of many an author — but its actual value is doubtful, and certainly not worth alot of effort or expense. So are all editorial reviews worthless? Definitely not.

Firstly, there are countless book bloggers who have strong and engaged audiences in niche genres — and many of them are open to reviewing books. Of course, it’ll require a bit of work on your part to get your book reviewed: you need to research each book blog in-depth, pitch your book elegantly (and well in advance), follow up, etc.

Whether that’s worth your time is up for you to decide, but it’s certainly an avenue worth considering, especially if you don’t have an established readership already. But here’s what’s even more important: even if an editorial review doesn’t yield you direct sales, it’s a fantastic tool to use for your other marketing efforts.

Editorial reviews tend to be written much better than your average random customer review, making them a lot more “quotable.” You can re-use such quotes in your book description, back cover copy, or advertising copy .

A quote from a recognised source in your genre will carry a lot more weight in the eyes of readers than one from “Anonymous Amazon Customer.”

Use a Kindle to read eBooks? Read them all for free!

Goodreads: Promoting your book

As part of our series on helping authors market their books, this article is about GoodReads.

The Goodreads Author Program

Become a Goodreads Author

The Goodreads Author Program allows published authors to claim their profile page to promote their book and engage with readers. Once verified, an author profile will include the official Goodreads Author badge, which can be used to tell fans to follow on Goodreads.

Benefits of Claiming a Profile Page

Manage Your Profile

Update your profile picture, write your bio, and fix your book listings—by joining the Goodreads Author Program you’re able to keep the information about yourself up-to-date.

Promote Your Books

Run a giveaway, connect your blog, advertise your books—the Goodreads Author Program gives you access to the marketing tools you need to build buzz around your books.

Interact with Readers

Take questions from readers using Ask The Author, write reviews, and show off your taste in literature. Readers love to learn what books their favorite authors are reading!

Claiming Your Profile

To apply for the Author Program, you can follow these steps when visiting the desktop version of Goodreads:

  1. Sign in or create an account, and then search for your most popular book via ISBN, ASIN, or title.
  2. On the book, click on your author name. Scroll to the bottom of your author profile page.
  3. Click “Is this you? Let us know!” to complete and submit the application.

Already a Goodreads Author? Learn how to use the Author Program effectively on Authors & Advertisers Blog.